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Emily Eyefinger / Duncan Ball ; illustrated by George Ulrich.

By: Ball, Duncan, 1941-.
Contributor(s): Smith, Craig | Ulrich, George | Ulrich, George.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookSeries: Emily Eyefinger. Publisher: New York ; Sydney : Simon & Schuster, c1992Description: 82 p. : ill ; 24 cm.ISBN: 0671746189; 9780207196041 .Subject(s): Identity -- Fiction | Eye -- Fiction | Spies -- Fiction | Premiers' Reading Challenge : 3-4DDC classification: 823.3 Summary: A young girl feels different from everyone else because she has an eye on the end of one finger, but it comes in handy onoccasion, such as when she is helping to catch a spy.
Item type Current location Collection Call number Status Date due Barcode Item reserves
Junior Keilor Library
Junior Fiction J BALL Available IA1545207
Junior Deer Park Library (DIY)
Junior Fiction J BALL Available IA1545231
Junior Sydenham Library (DIY)
Junior Fiction J BALL Available IA1545249
Junior Sunshine Library (DIY)
Junior Fiction J BALL Available IA1531402
Junior St Albans Library
Junior Fiction J BALL Available IA1545223
Junior St Albans Library (DIY)
Junior Fiction J BALL Issued 10/01/2019 IA1531410
Total reserves: 0

Copy published in 1997 illustrated by Craig Smith

A young girl feels different from everyone else because she has an eye on the end of one finger, but it comes in handy onoccasion, such as when she is helping to catch a spy.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

School Library Journal Review

Gr 2-4-- This story has an intriguing concept: a little girl is born with an eye on her finger. Each chapter marks an episode of mild adventure with Emily using her ``eye finger'' to find missing objects, catch bank robbers, and even guide a boat crew through a thick fog. Unfortunately, Emily is a one-dimensional character. Readers never know how old she is or even where the story takes place. Although Ball professes to have written the book to illustrate that there are valuable qualities in all people, the tone of Emily's parents toward her is neither realistic nor understanding. Also, the humor is corny. Ball definitely has an original idea, but it never gets off the ground. --Cheryl Cufari, N.A. Walbran Elementary School, Oriskany, NY (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Booklist Review

Gr. 2-4. Emily Eyefinger was born with an eye at the end of her left index finger. Though her extra eye is a nuisance at times, Emily effectively uses it to tame the school bully, find a snake that escaped at the zoo, and solve a bank robbery. She never uses her gift mischieviously or wrongfully in this fanciful tale in which most of the characters' names represent appearance, occupation, or inclination. Younger readers may not understand all of the wordplay, but they'll catch on to Emily's own joke: "On the one hand, I like it; on the other hand, I don't." A quick-and-easy chapter book, enlivened by eight black-and-white cartoon-style drawings. ~--Karen Hutt

Horn Book Review

This chapter book about a little girl with a third eye on her fingertip makes one think of a bedtime story told by an inventive parent. The black-and-white illustrations are amusing, but the fantasy and the sometimes unappealing heroine leave the reader unsatisfied. From HORN BOOK 1992, (c) Copyright 2010. The Horn Book, Inc., a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

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