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Anne of Green Gables.

By: Montgomery, L. M. (Lucy Maud), 1874-1942.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: Sydney : Angus & Robertson, 1972Description: 256 p. ; 19 cm.ISBN: 0207123233.Subject(s): Premiers' Reading Challenge : 7-8
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On Order - Extra Copies
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Total reserves: 2

Excerpt provided by Syndetics

Daring was the fashionable amusement among the Avonlea small fry just then. It had begun among the boys, but soon spread to the girls, and all the silly things that were done in Avonlea that summer because the doers thereof were "dared" to do them would fill a book by themselves. . . . Now, to "walk" board fences requires more skill and steadiness of head and heel than one might suppose who has never tried it. But Josie Pye, if deficient in some qualities that make for popularity, had at least a natural and inborn gift, duly cultivated, for walking board fences. Josie walked the Barry fence with an airy unconcern which seemed to imply that a little thing like that wasn't worth a "dare." Reluctant admiration greeted her exploit, for most of the other girls could appreciate it, having suffered many things themselves in their efforts to walk fences. Josie descended from her perch, flushed with victory, and darted a defiant glance at Anne. Anne tossed her red braids. "I don't think it's such a very wonderful thing to walk a little, low, board fence," she said. "I knew a girl in Marysville who could walk the ridge-pole of a roof." "I don't believe it," said Josie flatly. "I don't believe anybody could walk a ridge-pole. You couldn't, anyhow." "Couldn't I?" cried Anne rashly. "Then I dare you to do it," said Josie defiantly. "I dare you to climb up there and walk the ridge-pole of Mr. Barry's kitchen roof." Anne turned pale, but there was clearly only one thing to be done. She walked towards the house, where a ladder was leaning against the kitchen roof. All the fifth-class girls said, "Oh!" partly in excitement, partly in dismay. "Don't you do it, Anne," entreated Diana. "You'll fall off and be killed. Never mind Josie Pye. It isn't fair to dare anybody to do anything so dangerous." "I must do it. My honour is at stake," said Anne solemnly. "I shall walk that ridge-pole, Diana, or perish in the attempt. If I am killed you are to have my pearl bead ring." Anne climbed the ladder amid breathless silence, gained the ridge-pole, balanced herself uprightly on that precarious footing, and started to walk along it, dizzily conscious that she was uncomfortably high up in the world and that walking ridge-poles was not a thing in which your imagination helped you out much. Nevertheless, she managed to take several steps before the catastrophe came. Then she swayed, lost her balance, stumbled, staggered and fell, sliding down over the sun-baked roof and crashing off it through the tangle of Virginia creeper beneath -- all before the dismayed circle below could give a simultaneous, terrified shriek. If Anne had tumbled off the roof on the side up which she ascended Diana would probably have fallen heir to the pearl bead ring then and there. Fortunately she fell on the other side, where the roof extended down over the porch so nearly to the ground that a fall therefrom was a much less serious thing. Nevertheless, when Diana and the other girls had rushed frantically around the house -- except Ruby Gillis, who remained as if rooted to the ground and went into hysterics -- they found Anne lying all white and limp among the wreck and ruin of the Virginia creeper. "Anne, are you killed?" shrieked Diana, throwing herself on her knees beside her friend. "Oh, Anne, dear Anne, speak just one word to me and tell me if you're killed." To the immense relief of all the girls, and especially of Josie Pye, who, in spite of lack of imagination, had been seized with horrible visions of a future branded as the girl who was the cause of Anne Shirley's early and tragic death, Anne sat dizzily up and answered uncertainly: "No, Diana, I am not killed, but I think I am rendered unconscious." Excerpted from Anne of Green Gables by L. M. Montgomery All rights reserved by the original copyright owners. Excerpts are provided for display purposes only and may not be reproduced, reprinted or distributed without the written permission of the publisher.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

Nova Scotia-born children's author Wilson gives us the backstory to a classic, imagining little orphan Anne of Green Gables before she found her new family. Look for the 100th-anniversary edition of L.M. Montgomery's beloved work (ISBN 978-0-399-15478-2. $19.95). (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

School Library Journal Review

Gr 5-8-Anne never fit in at any of the foster homes she was sent to after her parents' deaths. When she is mistakenly sent to the Cuthbert's farmhouse, Green Gables, she is overjoyed. Although the foster parents wanted a boy, this mischievous, talkative, imaginative girl eventually gets under their skin. Kate Burton, an incredible vocal artist, provides superb narration for L. M. Montgomery's classic. She creates an irresistibly vivacious and breathless voice for Anne. She also provides an excellent voice for the repressed and proper Marilla Cuthbert, slowly allowing the woman's increasing affection for her charge to blossom. Shy Matthew Cuthbert is voiced quietly but firmly. Listeners will fall in love with Burton's performance as well as the spunky, exceptional Anne Shirley. A must-have for all libraries-B. Allison Gray, Goleta Public Library, Santa Barbara, CA (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Booklist Review

Gr. 6-8. An orphan girl finds happiness and security on a Nova Scotia farm when she is taken in by a kindly bachelor and his crusty sister. Beautifully filmed for television.

Horn Book Review

Two beloved Canadian classics lose much of their charm by being adapted for younger readers. While the most memorable events of each story remain true to the spirit of the originals, entire chapters were sacrificed and many richly descriptive passages were pared back in the dumbing down of these books. Both of the stories, in their unadapted form, make great read alouds for kids not yet able to tackle them on their own. From HORN BOOK Fall 1998, (c) Copyright 2010. The Horn Book, Inc., a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

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