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Esty's gold / by Mary Arrigan.

By: Arrigan, Mary.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: London : Frances Lincoln Children's, 2010Description: 221 p. ; 20 cm.ISBN: 9781845079659 (pbk.).Subject(s): Children's stories | Premiers' Reading Challenge : 7-8 | Irish -- Australia -- Ballarat (Vic.) -- Juvenile fiction | Gold mines and mining -- Australia -- Ballarat (Vic.) -- Juvenile fiction | Ireland -- History -- Famine, 1845-1852 -- Juvenile fiction | Ballarat (Vic.) -- Social conditions -- 19th century -- Juvenile fictionDDC classification: 823.92 Summary: Esty Maher's family is uprooted and torn apart during the Irish potato famine, but manages to get assisted passage to Australia. However, when they reach Ballarat, Esty's dream and hard work nearly turn to dust in the midst of scavenging and rebellion... Ages 13+.
Item type Current location Collection Call number Status Date due Barcode Item reserves
Junior Sydenham Library (DIY)
Junior Fiction J ARRI Available I6416194
Total reserves: 0

Esty Maher's family is uprooted and torn apart during the Irish potato famine, but manages to get assisted passage to Australia. However, when they reach Ballarat, Esty's dream and hard work nearly turn to dust in the midst of scavenging and rebellion... Ages 13+.

Excerpt provided by Syndetics

May and I ran ahead as Grandpa and James urged the horses on. Adam was already way in front, his long legs striding up the incline. James turned to us as his wagon sped past. 'Hey, girls!' he bellowed good-humouredly. 'Race you.' Rose waved her bonnet and Mama was laughing, as they leaned from the back of the wagon. 'Hop aboard, you two,' shouted Grandpa, making room on the front seat of our wagon. 'No thanks,' May called back. 'I want to be standing on my own two feet when I reach that goldfield.' 'Me too, Grandpa,' I laughed. Holding hands, we stumbled after them. They stopped at the top of the hill. Mama and Rose climbed down from the wagon. John Joe had dismounted and was rubbing the horse's nose. Adam reached the top and stood with them. 'Come on, May,' I panted. 'They'll see it before us.' Giggling, we joined them. But we fell silent when we looked over the place we'd travelled so far to reach. Stretched out below us was a bustling township of people, wagons, horses, even a coach and four that clattered along a busy street lined with a mix of weatherboard and fine stone buildings. I hadn't known what to expect Ballarat to look like, but such a civilised town was way beyond my imaginings. A short distance away, in the area we came to know as Sovereign Hill, hundreds of tents were packed close together around high chutes on stilts, wheels and other strange structures. Smoke was rising from fires, voices carried across to us as we stood up on the hill. Mama had her hands to her face, and she was speechless. Rose's arms were folded across her big chest, an expression of disbelief on her face. Grandpa was nodding his head. Then a broad smile lit up his face. 'We've made it,' he said. 'Can you believe it? We've actually arrived in Ballarat.' Excerpted from Esty's Gold by Mary Arrigan All rights reserved by the original copyright owners. Excerpts are provided for display purposes only and may not be reproduced, reprinted or distributed without the written permission of the publisher.

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