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100% me / [written and edited by Elinor Greenwood and Alexander Cox].

By: Greenwood, Elinor.
Contributor(s): Cox, Alexander.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: New York : Dorling Kindersley, 2009Description: 96 p. : col. ill. ; 23 cm.ISBN: 9780756634704 (hbk.).Other title: One hundred percent me.Subject(s): Puberty -- Juvenile literature | Teenage boys -- Physiology -- Juvenile literature | Teenage girls -- Physiology -- Juvenile literatureDDC classification: 612.661 Summary: As kids grow up and reach puberty, their bodies start to change and develop; they're bound to have all kinds of questions - but what exactly is happening? This guide tells girls and boys about what they need to know. It includes graphics, quizzes and answers to common questions.
Item type Current location Collection Call number Status Date due Barcode Item reserves
Junior Deer Park Library (DIY)
Health, Wellbeing & Family
Junior Non Fiction J 612.661 GREE Available I6530388
Junior Sunshine Library (DIY)
Health, Wellbeing & Family
Junior Non Fiction J 612.661 GREE Issued 02/01/2020 I6530370
Total reserves: 0

"Boys and girls: here's the how, why, and when of growing up"--Cover.

Includes index.

As kids grow up and reach puberty, their bodies start to change and develop; they're bound to have all kinds of questions - but what exactly is happening? This guide tells girls and boys about what they need to know. It includes graphics, quizzes and answers to common questions.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

School Library Journal Review

Gr 5-9-This guide to puberty is designed to answer questions about physical and mental changes that occur during adolescence. It combines basic biology with graphics and art design reminiscent of MySpace pages. Though likely meant to arm readers with solid information, the tone of the book may increase readers' anxiety. For example, on the spread "Puberty: It's Gross vs. It's Great," the "great" side seems like a stretch to counterbalance the "gross" column. Separate sections on boys and girls are good, but the shared-experience section, "100% Me," is pretty spare. Also irksome are the references to the "majority of people" being heterosexual. While statistically supported, it may still unintentionally serve to isolate GLBTQ readers. Other books on puberty, such as Lynda Madaras's titles, cover the same ground with a more reassuring, neutral tone.-Elaine Baran Black, Georgia Public Library Service, Atlanta (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

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