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The throne of fire / Rick Riordan.

By: Riordan, Rick.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookSeries: The Kane chronicles ; [2]. Publisher: Camberwell, Vic. : Puffin, 2011Description: 451 p. ; 22 cm.ISBN: 9780141335667 (pbk).Subject(s): Children's stories | Magic -- Juvenile fiction | Brothers and sisters -- Juvenile fiction | Adventure stories | Voyages and travels -- Juvenile fiction | Premiers' Reading Challenge : 7-8 | Premiers' Reading Challenge : 9-10 | Mythology, Egyptian -- Juvenile fictionDDC classification: 813.6 Summary: "Ever since the gods of Ancient Egypt were unleashed on the modern world, Carter Kane and his sister, Sadie, have been in trouble. As descendants of the magical House of Life, they command certain powers. But now a terrifying enemy – Apophis, the giant snake of chaos – is rising.If Carter and Sadie don't destroy him, the world will end in five days time. And in order to battle the forces of chaos, they musty revive the sun god Ra – a feat no magician has ever achieved. First they must search the world for the three sections of the Book of Ra, then they have to learn how to chant the spells . . .Can the Kanes destroy Apophis before he swallows the sun and plunges the earth into darkness . . . forever?" -- Book cover.
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Item type Current location Collection Call number Status Date due Barcode Item reserves
Junior Sunshine Library
Junior Fiction J RIOR Issued 14/09/2019 I6986482
Total reserves: 0

Also published New York : Disney/Hyperion and London : Puffin, 2011.

"Ever since the gods of Ancient Egypt were unleashed on the modern world, Carter Kane and his sister, Sadie, have been in trouble. As descendants of the magical House of Life, they command certain powers. But now a terrifying enemy – Apophis, the giant snake of chaos – is rising.If Carter and Sadie don't destroy him, the world will end in five days time. And in order to battle the forces of chaos, they musty revive the sun god Ra – a feat no magician has ever achieved. First they must search the world for the three sections of the Book of Ra, then they have to learn how to chant the spells . . .Can the Kanes destroy Apophis before he swallows the sun and plunges the earth into darkness . . . forever?" -- Book cover.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Publishers Weekly Review

The amazing performances of Kevin R. Free and Katherine Kellgren make this YA fantasy-the second volume in Riordan's The Kane Chronicles-enthralling for listeners of any age. Descendants of the House of Life, Carter and Sadie Kane are teenage magicians responsible for preventing Egyptian gods from interfering with mortals. And this time around, the brother-and-sister team face off against the chaos snake Apophis-something that's bound to interfere with Sadie's 13th birthday party. But even being chased through the streets of London by monstrous gods doesn't slow down Sadie. Meanwhile, Carter continues to train a troupe of young magicians to battle the forces of evil. Free deftly handles Carter's narration; he sounds exactly like a 14-year-old boy, while voicing dozens of other characters. Kellgren's narration is no less impressive, and her interpretation of a budding teen girl is exuberant and believable, as are the multitude of other colorful characters she creates. Between these two spirited performances, the characters come to life and leave listeners breathless. A Hyperion hardcover. (May) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.

School Library Journal Review

Gr 5-8-Sadie and Carter, children of Egyptologist Dr. Julius Kane, are back in the second title (Hyperion, 2011) in a projected trilogy by Rick Riordan. This time, they are causing chaos in both the Brooklyn Museum in New York and the Hermitage in St. Petersburg, Russia, as they try to save the world from total annihilation. The danger is from Apophis, the god of chaos, who plans to destroy the rest of the gods and rule in their place. To thwart him, Sadie and Carter are trying to locate Ra, the god of order, and restore him to power. Along with plot complications as Sadie and Carter try to find the three sections of the Book of Ra, there are questions of loyalty among the gods and the 20 trainees who have come to Brooklyn House to follow in Sadie and Carter's footsteps. Told in the first person from Sadie and Carter's points of view, Kevin R. Free and Katherine Kellgren once again narrate in fine style, capturing the personality traits of all the characters. Apophis's snake-like voice is pure evil and Ra's child-like requests for cookies, zebras, and other "lame" enticements reflect his senility and fragility. The dwarf god Bes is particularly well-realized with his tough-guy talk (like a New York hoodlum) but warm heart and even shyness around his love interest. While the book is action-packed, it's the dialogue that keeps listeners engaged. The plot and cast of characters in this book will be more understandable to those familiar with The Red Pyramid (2010, both Hyperion; Brilliance, 2011). Full of magic, danger, fantasy, and adventure, this is a memorable listen.-Edie Ching, The University of Maryland, College Park (c) Copyright 2011. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Booklist Review

Readers of The Red Pyramid (2010) will not be unduly surprised that the magical powers of Carter and Sadie are growing or that they have the purest motives for breaking into the Brooklyn Museum to steal a three-ton Egyptian artifact or that battling griffins and plague spirits wreaks a certain amount of havoc. Still, with only five days left before the spring equinox, when an evil magician will let the Egyptian serpent god, Apophis (think chaos), loose in the world again, it's time for action. As in his earlier novels for children, Riordan combines hard-hitting action scenes, powerful magic, and comic relief with the internal waves of love, jealousy, and self-doubt that make his young heroes so very human. The book concludes with glossaries of Egyptian commands and terms as well as gods and goddesses, but even readers who lose track of the details will enjoy the high-energy story as it races toward a conclusion. Lit by flashes of humor, this fantasy adventure is an engaging addition to the Kane Chronicles series.--Phelan, Caroly. Copyright 2010 Booklist

Horn Book Review

In The Red Pyramid (rev. 7/10), siblings Carter and Sadie Kane learned that, as descendants of Egyptian pharaohs, they are magicians who can communicate with (and fight against) the Egyptian gods. Now with Apophis, Lord of Chaos, about to break his millennia-long imprisonment, Sadie and Carter must awaken Ra the Sun God to unite the gods and magicians against Apophis and save the world from destruction. Globetrotting action and irreverent commentary fly fast and furious as the pair battle gods, evil magicians, and mythical Egyptian monsters to retrieve the Book of Ra, then re-create the Sun God's nightly journey through the underworld to revive his spirit, meeting their dead parents and gambling for their own souls along the way. The author's formula works -- the Egyptian myths offer a backdrop with plenty of depth, against which Riordan's wisecracking heroes can play out their high-stakes family, relationship, and personal dramas. And with Ra awakened but old and weak, the magicians in rebellion, personal peril and/or teenage heartbreak in store for the Kanes, and Apophis still on the rise, the expected third book in the Kane Chronicles promises to be as lively, humorous, and welcome as the first two. anita l. burkam (c) Copyright 2011. The Horn Book, Inc., a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

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