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The witches / Roald Dahl; illustrated by Quentin Blake.

By: Dahl, Roald, 1916-1990.
Contributor(s): Blake, Quentin.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: London : Puffin Books, 2007Description: 199 p. : ill. ; 20 cm.ISBN: 9780141322643; 9780141346410; 9780141365473 ; 9780141345178.Subject(s): Witches -- Juvenile fiction | Witchcraft -- Juvenile fiction | Grandmothers -- Juvenile fiction | Premiers' Reading Challenge : 5-6DDC classification: 823.914 Summary: A young boy and his Norwegian grandmother, who is an expert on witches, together foil a witches' plot to destroy the world's children by turning them into mice.
Item type Current location Collection Call number Status Date due Barcode Item reserves
Junior Sunshine Library (DIY)
Junior Fiction J DAHL Available IA1549798
Junior Deer Park Library (DIY)
Junior Fiction J DAHL Issued 05/06/2019 IA1549772
Junior Sunshine Library (DIY)
Junior Fiction J DAHL Available IA0354078
Junior St Albans Library (DIY)
Junior Fiction J DAHL Issued 05/06/2019 IA2002459
Junior Deer Park Library (DIY)
Junior Fiction J DAHL Issued 15/06/2019 IA2002458
Junior Deer Park Library (DIY)
Junior Fiction J DAHL Issued 08/05/2019 IA2002460
Junior Sydenham Library (DIY)
Junior Fiction J DAHL Available IA1549780
Junior Sydenham Library (DIY)
Junior Fiction J DAHL Issued 30/05/2019 IA1549803
Total reserves: 0

First published: London : J. Cape, 1983.

For children.

A young boy and his Norwegian grandmother, who is an expert on witches, together foil a witches' plot to destroy the world's children by turning them into mice.

For children.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Booklist Review

Gr. 4-6. One of Dahl's best about a boy who is turned into a mouse, but who nevertheless takes on the Grand High Witch of the World. Funny, yes, but a little scary as well.

Kirkus Book Review

By a talky, roundabout route, Dahl slyly (if deterringly) takes the narrator--ostensibly himself at seven--into the delicious, ambiguous situation of being a mouse-boy. . . who turns the tables on his tormentors. We first hear about witches: they spend their time plotting to get rid of children, ""they all look like nice ladies,"" they are difficult but not impossible to spot. Then, we hear about Dahl's cigar-smoking Norwegian grandmother, who told him about witches and how to spot them: they all wear wigs to cover their bald heads, for one thing, and have itchy scalps. So, when Dahl and his grandmother are at a Bournemouth hotel, and the lady-delegates to the Royal Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children conference start scratching away (p. 57), Dahl is wary. Then the pretty head lady takes off her mask: the Grand High Witch incarnate! To demonstrate her Formula 86 Delayed Action Mouse-Maker, she's already fed some to greedy, obnoxious little Bruno Jenkins--who turns into a mouse on schedule. Will Dahl be detected, hiding behind a screen? He hasn't washed in days, but some of that tell-tale child-scent, anathema to witches, escapes. Forcefed the potion, he joins Bruno scampering about the floor--but they still have their own voices, and his wonderful witchophile grandmother will know what to do. Actually, Dahl's wits have if anything sharpened. With his grandmother as a confederate, he steals a bottle of the potion; pours it into the witch-delegates' soup tureen; and has the exquisite pleasure of seeing them turned into mice, to be wiped out on the spot. (Bruno meanwhile is contentedly munching away--to the horror of his mouse-hating parents.) When last seen, DaM and his grandmother are quietly resettled in Norway--where he wonders if she'll live out Ms short mouse-life span, and she's plotting to get rid of the world's remaining witches. A (quicker-acting) sequel is to be eagerly expected. Copyright ┬ęKirkus Reviews, used with permission.

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