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Medea and other plays / Euripides ; translated by John Davie ; introduction and notes by Richard Rutherford.

By: Euripides.
Contributor(s): Rutherford, R. B | Davie, John N.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookSeries: Penguin classics. Publisher: Camberwell, Vic. : Penguin Books, 2003Edition: [Rev. ed.].Description: xlvii, 206 p. ; 20 cm.ISBN: 9780140449297.Uniform titles: Alcestis and other plays Subject(s): Euripides -- Translations into English | Heracles (Greek mythology) -- Family -- Drama | Hippolytus (Greek mythology) -- Drama | Alcestis (Greek mythology) -- Drama | Medea (Greek mythology) -- DramaDDC classification: 882.01
Contents:
Alcestis -- Medea -- The children of Heracles -- Hippolytus.
Summary: Medea, in which a spurned woman takes revenge upon her lover by killing her children, is one of the most shocking of all the Greek tragedies. Dominating the play is Medea herself, a towering figure who demonstrates Euripides' unusual willingness to give voice to a woman's case. Alcestis, a tragicomedy, is based on a magical myth in which Death is overcome, and The Children of Heracles examines conflict between might and right, while Hippolytus deals with self-destructive integrity and moral dilemmas. These plays show Euripides transforming awesome figures of Greek myths into recognizable, fallible human beings.
Item type Current location Collection Call number Status Date due Barcode Item reserves
Default Deer Park Library
Education
Non-fiction 882.01 EURI Available I7161530
Default St Albans Library (DIY)
Education
Non-fiction 882.01 EURI Available I7161514
Default Deer Park Library
Education
Non-fiction 882.01 EURI Available I7161522
Total reserves: 0

Previously published as: Alcestis and other plays.

Includes bibliographical references (p. [193]-197)

Alcestis -- Medea -- The children of Heracles -- Hippolytus.

Medea, in which a spurned woman takes revenge upon her lover by killing her children, is one of the most shocking of all the Greek tragedies. Dominating the play is Medea herself, a towering figure who demonstrates Euripides' unusual willingness to give voice to a woman's case. Alcestis, a tragicomedy, is based on a magical myth in which Death is overcome, and The Children of Heracles examines conflict between might and right, while Hippolytus deals with self-destructive integrity and moral dilemmas. These plays show Euripides transforming awesome figures of Greek myths into recognizable, fallible human beings.

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