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The breadwinner / Deborah Ellis.

By: Ellis, Deborah, 1960-.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookSeries: Breadwinner ; 01. Publisher: [Sydney] : Read How You Want, [2013]Edition: Large print edition.Description: 148 p. (large print) : maps ; 24 cm.ISBN: 9781459664838.Subject(s): Taliban -- Juvenile fiction | Girls -- Afghanistan -- Juvenile fiction | Refugees -- Afghanistan -- Juvenile fiction | Large type books | Young adult fiction | Afghanistan -- Juvenile fictionDDC classification: 813.6 Summary: Eleven - year - old Parvana lives with her family in one room of a bombed - out apartment building in Kabul, Afghanistan's capital city. Parvana's father - a history teacher until his school was bombed and his health destroyed - works from a blanket on the ground in the marketplace, reading letters for people who cannot read or write. One day, he is arrested for the crime of having a foreign education, and the family is left wihtout someone who can earn money or even shop for food. As conditions for the family grow desperate, only one solution emerges. Forbidden to earn money as a girl, Parvana must transform herself into a boy, and become the breadwinner. The Breadwinner is a novel about loyalty, survival, families and friendship under extraordinary circumstances.
Item type Current location Collection Call number Status Date due Barcode Item reserves
Junior St Albans Library
Teenage Fiction T ELLI Available I8209187
Total reserves: 0

First book in the Breadwinner Trilogy -- cover.

Originally published :Toronto, ON : Groundwood Books/House of Anansi Press Inc., 2011, c2002.

ISBN (9781554980079) on t.p. verso is for Groundwood Books/House of Anansi Press Inc, 2011, c2002.

Set in 16 pt. Verdana.

Eleven - year - old Parvana lives with her family in one room of a bombed - out apartment building in Kabul, Afghanistan's capital city. Parvana's father - a history teacher until his school was bombed and his health destroyed - works from a blanket on the ground in the marketplace, reading letters for people who cannot read or write. One day, he is arrested for the crime of having a foreign education, and the family is left wihtout someone who can earn money or even shop for food. As conditions for the family grow desperate, only one solution emerges. Forbidden to earn money as a girl, Parvana must transform herself into a boy, and become the breadwinner. The Breadwinner is a novel about loyalty, survival, families and friendship under extraordinary circumstances.

For children aged 12-16 years.

Excerpt provided by Syndetics

Parvana felt the shadow before she saw it, as the man moved between her and the sun. Turning her head, she saw the dark turban that was the uniform of the Taliban. A rifle was slung across his chest as casually as her father's shoulder bag had been slung across hers.... The Talib kept looking down at her. Then he put his hand inside his vest. Keeping his eyes on Parvana, he drew something out of his vest pocket. Parvana was about to squish her eyes shut and wait to be shot when she saw that the Talib had taken out a letter. He sat down beside her on the blanket. "Read this," he said. Excerpted from The Breadwinner (movie Tie-In Edition) by Deborah Ellis All rights reserved by the original copyright owners. Excerpts are provided for display purposes only and may not be reproduced, reprinted or distributed without the written permission of the publisher.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Publishers Weekly Review

Ellis (Looking for X) bases her contemporary novel on refugee stories about the oppressive rule of Afghanistan by the Taliban. Eleven-year-old Parvana must masquerade as a boy to gain access to the outside world and support her dwindling family. Parvana's brother was killed years earlier by a land mine explosion and, for much of the story, her father is imprisoned, leaving only her mother, older sister and two very young siblings. The Taliban laws require women to sheathe themselves fully and ban girls from attending school or going out unescorted; thus, Parvana's disguise provides her a measure of freedom and the means to support her family by providing a reading service for illiterates. There are some sympathetic moments, as when Parvana sees the effect on her mother when she wears her dead brother's clothes and realizes, while reading a letter for a recently widowed Taliban soldier, that even the enemy can have feelings. However, the story's tensions sometimes seem forced (e.g., Parvana's own fear of stepping on land mines). In addition, the narrative voice often feels removed "After the Soviets left, the people who had been shooting at the Soviets decided they wanted to keep shooting at something, so they shot at each other" taking on a tone more akin to a disquisition than compelling fiction. However, the topical issues introduced, coupled with this strong heroine, will make this novel of interest to many conscientious teens. Ages 10-12. (Apr.) FYI: All royalties from the sale of the book will be donated to Women for Women in Afghanistan, dedicated to the education of Afghan girls in refugee camps in Pakistan. (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved

School Library Journal Review

Gr 5-8-For 11-year-old Parvana and her family, survival in war-torn Afghanistan is difficult. The Taliban have decreed that women stay inside their homes, unless completely covered by a long, tentlike garment with a veil over the face. Girls can no longer go to school. Parvana's only relief is accompanying her father to the market where he works as a letter writer and sells family possessions. After he is arrested and taken away, Parvana becomes the breadwinner, dressing as a boy and taking over her father's job. One day, she recognizes a school friend, similarly disguised. The two team up to dig human bones to sell to make extra money, always fearful that their secret will be revealed and that they, too, will be imprisoned or worse. After Parvana's older sister, younger siblings, and mother leave for the north, Parvana learns that the town they went to has been taken over by the Taliban in a bloody battle. There seems to be no hope, until, unaccountably, her father appears, released from prison, and they decide to leave Kabul in search of the rest of their family. The author's sympathy with the women of Afghanistan is evident; her outrage at their treatment makes the single moment when Parvana sees a Talib as human, with feelings, stand out. The girl's courage and wit are admirable; she comes alive as a character far more than Kabul comes alive as a place. The book lacks the details about this region and culture that would help unfamiliar readers understand that world more clearly.-Kathleen Isaacs, Edmund Burke School, Washington, DC (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Booklist Review

Gr. 5^-7. Ever since the fundamentalist group Taliban secured power in the Afghan capital of Kabul, Parvana and her family have suffered. The group's relentless oppression makes it impossible for the women of the family to leave the house without their father. When Parvana's elderly father is arrested on the grounds that he is a scholar, the women are trapped in their cramped apartment. Eventually, running out of food and hope, Parvana dresses as a boy and becomes the family's breadwinner, doing whatever is necessary to keep the family alive--from reading letters for the illiterate to digging up and selling the bones of her ancestors. Unfortunately, the novel never deals with the religious facets of Afghan life, failing to explain that the Taliban sees itself, essentially, as a religious group. Nonetheless, The Breadwinner is a potent portrait of life in contemporary Afghanistan, showing that powerful heroines can survive even in the most oppressive and sexist social conditions. --John Green

Horn Book Review

Since the Taliban took over Afghanistan, Parvana has been unable to go to school or leave the house without a male relative. When her father is taken away to jail, however, Parvana must seek work disguised as a boy in order to support her family. The obstacles faced by women under the repressive regime are convincingly and sympathetically portrayed as Parvana's story unfolds. From HORN BOOK Fall 2001, (c) Copyright 2010. The Horn Book, Inc., a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

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