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A million windows / Gerald Murnane.

By: Murnane, Gerald, 1939-.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookCopyright date: ©2014Publisher: Artarmon, NSW : Giramondo Publishing, 2014Description: 192 pages ; 21 cm.Content type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 9781922146533 (paperback).Subject(s): Australian fiction -- 21st century | Interpersonal relations -- Fiction | Trust -- FictionDDC classification: A823.4 Summary: This novel focuses on the importance of trust, and the possibility of betrayal, in storytelling as in life. It tests the relationship established between author and reader, and on occasions of intimacy, between child and parent, boyfriend and girlfriend, husband and wife. Murnane's fiction is woven from images, and the feelings associated with them, and the images that flit through this novel like butterflies - the reflections of the setting sun like spots of golden oil, the houses of two or perhaps three storeys, the procession of dark-haired females, the clearing in the forest, the colours indigo and silver-grey, the death of a young woman who had leaped into a well - build to an emotional crescendo that is all the more powerful for the intricacy of their patterning.
Item type Current location Collection Call number Status Date due Barcode Item reserves
Default Sunshine Library (DIY)
Fiction MUNR Available I8227216
Default Deer Park Library
Fiction MUNR Available I8227232
Default Sydenham Library (DIY)
Fiction MUNR Available I8227224
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This novel focuses on the importance of trust, and the possibility of betrayal, in storytelling as in life. It tests the relationship established between author and reader, and on occasions of intimacy, between child and parent, boyfriend and girlfriend, husband and wife. Murnane's fiction is woven from images, and the feelings associated with them, and the images that flit through this novel like butterflies - the reflections of the setting sun like spots of golden oil, the houses of two or perhaps three storeys, the procession of dark-haired females, the clearing in the forest, the colours indigo and silver-grey, the death of a young woman who had leaped into a well - build to an emotional crescendo that is all the more powerful for the intricacy of their patterning.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Publishers Weekly Review

Part memoir and part manifesto, Australian writer Murnane's series of fictional and essayistic experiments requires careful consideration and study. The premise of the book extends from the Henry James epigraph that opens it: "The house of fiction has in short not one window, but a million." Murnane walks readers through several of his distinctive touchstones of writing, and he illustrates his arguments with multiple vignettes and fictional scenarios. Murnane is brooding and deeply serious about his subject matter. He ruminates on the effects of memory by writing variations of a story in which a man sees a young girl on a train. The encounter opens a door of possibility, and Murnane wants the reader to realize that this story could ultimately be written "in any of a million ways." He often writes in lengthy, spiraling sentences and is prone to making broad pronouncements such as "One of the many devices employed by writers of fiction is the use of the present tense." Murnane frequently contrasts the abilities of fiction with those of film-to the detriment of film. Murnane is a master of breathing life into fiction, and his compilation of ideas on the subject holds immense value because those ideas are often so idiosyncratic and contrarian. (May) © Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.

Booklist Review

Acclaimed in Australia, Murnane is too little known in the States. His eleventh novel has postmodern trappings: unnamed characters and nearly no story, while the structure is intricate and the prose is precise, self-referential, allusive, essayistic, and abstract. Difficult to say what the subject of this beautiful and strange tale might be, but here's a clue: to understand how the so-called actual and the so-called possible what he did and what he only dreamed of doing come finally to be indistinguishable in the sort of text we call true fiction. He opposes Coleridge's platitude that fiction demands the willing suspension of disbelief, and draws his title from a remark by Henry James. Murnane argues that true fiction is more worthy of trust than what he calls the visible world, and that the discerning reader can and should accept as truth what takes place in the narrative dimension more than what she observes in life. This may sound preposterous, but the proof is in the reading of this astonishing feat by a writer of profound conviction.--Autrey, Michael Copyright 2016 Booklist

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