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To name those lost / Rohan Wilson.

By: Wilson, Rohan.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: Crows Nest, NSW Allen & Unwin, 2014Copyright date: ©2014Description: 297 pages ; 24 cm.Content type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 9781743318324 (paperback).Subject(s): Australian fiction -- 21st century | Fathers and sons -- Tasmania -- Launceston -- Fiction | Launceston (Tas.) -- History -- 19th century -- FictionDDC classification: A823.4 Summary: Summer 1874, and Launceston teeters on the brink of anarchy. After abandoning his wife and child many years ago, the Black War veteran Thomas Toosey must return to the city to search for William, his now motherless twelve-year-old son. He travels through the island's northern districts during a time of impossible hardship - hardship that has left its mark on him too. Arriving in Launceston, however, Toosey discovers a town in chaos. He is desperate to find his son amid the looting and destruction, but at every turn he is confronted by the Irish transportee Fitheal Flynn and his companion, the hooded man, to whom Toosey owes a debt that he must repay. 'To Name Those Lost' is the story of a father's journey. Wilson has an eye for the dirt, the hardness, the sheer dog-eat-doggedness of the lives of the poor. Human nature is revealed in all its horror and beauty as Thomas Toosey struggles with the good and the vile in himself and learns what he holds important.
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Default Deer Park Library (DIY)
Fiction WILS Available IA0512585
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Fiction WILS Available IA0512605
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Fiction WILS Available IA0512592
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Summer 1874, and Launceston teeters on the brink of anarchy. After abandoning his wife and child many years ago, the Black War veteran Thomas Toosey must return to the city to search for William, his now motherless twelve-year-old son. He travels through the island's northern districts during a time of impossible hardship - hardship that has left its mark on him too. Arriving in Launceston, however, Toosey discovers a town in chaos. He is desperate to find his son amid the looting and destruction, but at every turn he is confronted by the Irish transportee Fitheal Flynn and his companion, the hooded man, to whom Toosey owes a debt that he must repay. 'To Name Those Lost' is the story of a father's journey. Wilson has an eye for the dirt, the hardness, the sheer dog-eat-doggedness of the lives of the poor. Human nature is revealed in all its horror and beauty as Thomas Toosey struggles with the good and the vile in himself and learns what he holds important.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

Among the proper and prosperous residents of 1870s Launceston, Australia, are a number of miscreants, molesters, and murderers, members of that country's storied past. One of these men is Thomas Toosey, a dangerous and desperate outlaw on the hunt for his son, William, who has recently lost his mother. Hot on his heels are Fitheal Flynn, from whom Toosey stole a worldly fortune of two hundred pounds, and Flynn's daughter, Caislin, who was badly injured in their tussle. Between these men is a ragtag crew of street urchins, some of whom hope to profit by revealing the whereabouts of one to the other. The two fiercely protective fathers will go to terrible lengths for the money, hoping to provide a better life for their children. Verdict Readers who admired the propulsive plotting, atmospheric sense of place, and fierce family loyalty in Patrick DeWitt's The Sisters Brothers and Cormac McCarthy's The Road should be equally taken with Wilson's (The Roving Party) superb novel. Highly recommended.--Barbara Love, formerly with Kingston Frontenac P.L., Ont. © Copyright 2017. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Publishers Weekly Review

Wilson's (The Roving Party) second novel is as violent, bleak, and absorbing as his highly-praised first. Again the setting is Tasmania, this time taking place in 1874. The efficient plot could be described as the tale of two seekers, dogged and inimical, squaring off. Thomas Toosey, an ex-convict said to be "on winking terms with the devil," is looking for his son, whose deceased mother he abandoned, to start a new life together. The Irishman Fitheal Flynn, "mad as a sack of rabbits," is looking for Toosey, who stole a considerable amount of money from him, and committing a more heinous act in the process. As Toosey gets closer to finding his son, Flynn gets closer to catching up with Toosey. They all converge in the chaotic, rough-and-tumble town of Launceston, whose inhabitants are rioting in protest of a new railway tax. Wilson has a fine ear for dialogue and nicely sketches main and supporting characters alike, except in the case of a lamentably cartoonish Chinese innkeeper. The brisk tale doesn't wade too deeply into the historical weeds, rather proceeding steadily to its final confrontations, inevitable but dramatic, savage but not gratuitous. This is a satisfying, grimy adventure about a reciprocal violence that pollutes. (Feb.) © Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.

Booklist Review

*Starred Review* And the sound of love is to name those lost who lived for others. Wilson tells a tale of love, rendered with aching beauty through the medium of loss. Upon his mother's death, William Toosey is left alone and adrift in Launceston, Tasmania, a hard and dangerous place in 1874, at the very end of the civilized world. His long-absent, convict father, Thomas, is willing to commit terrible acts to reunite with his young son. Standing in Thomas' way is the consequence of one of those acts, the ceaseless stalking of the boy by Irishman Fitheal Flynn and his strange, hooded companion. They intend to force repayment of a debt or exact the ultimate price. Like his first novel, The Roving Party, (2014), Wilson's second has garnered Australian literary awards, and the praise is entirely justified for this masterly portrayal of familial relationships in a society in which the threads of civilization have frayed to the snapping point. The prose is viscerally direct and unsparing in its emotional impact. A Launceston native, Wilson's evocation of the Tasmanian setting is pitch-perfect, as are his characterization and the suspense maintained throughout this exquisitely wrought novel.--Latham, Bethany Copyright 2017 Booklist

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