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How to write about contemporary art / Gilda Williams.

By: Williams, Gilda.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: London : Thames & Hudson, 2014Copyright date: ©2014Description: 264 pages : illustrations ; 21 cm.Content type: text | still image Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 9780500291573 (paperback).Subject(s): Art criticism -- AuthorshipDDC classification: 808.0667 Summary: How to Write About Contemporary Art is the definitive guide to writing engagingly about the art of our time. Invaluable for students, arts professionals and other aspiring writers, the book first navigates readers through the key elements of style and content, from the aims and structure of a piece to its tone and language. Brimming with practical tips that range across the complete spectrum of art-writing, the second part of the book is organized around its specific forms, including academic essays; press releases and news articles; texts for auction and exhibition catalogues, gallery guides and wall labels; op-ed journalism and exhibition reviews; and writing for websites and blogs. In counselling the reader against common pitfalls such as jargon and poor structure, Gilda Williams points instead to the power of close looking and research, showing how to deploy language effectively; how to develop new ideas; and how to construct compelling texts. More than 30 illustrations throughout support closely analysed case studies of the best writing, in Source Texts by 64 authors, including Claire Bishop, Thomas Crow, T.J. Demos, Okwui Enwezor, Dave Hickey, John Kelsey, Chris Kraus, Rosalind Krauss, Stuart Morgan, Hito Steyerl, and Adam Szymczyk. Supplemented by a general bibliography, advice on the use and misuse of grammar, and tips on how to construct your own contemporary art library, How to Write About Contemporary Art is the essential handbook for all those interested in communicating about the art of today.
Item type Current location Collection Call number Status Date due Barcode Item reserves
Default Deer Park Library
Education
Non-fiction 808.0667 WILL Available IA0525642
Default Sydenham Library
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Non-fiction 808.0667 WILL Issued 23/04/2019 IA0525666
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Non-fiction 808.0667 WILL Available IA0525659
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How to Write About Contemporary Art is the definitive guide to writing engagingly about the art of our time. Invaluable for students, arts professionals and other aspiring writers, the book first navigates readers through the key elements of style and content, from the aims and structure of a piece to its tone and language. Brimming with practical tips that range across the complete spectrum of art-writing, the second part of the book is organized around its specific forms, including academic essays; press releases and news articles; texts for auction and exhibition catalogues, gallery guides and wall labels; op-ed journalism and exhibition reviews; and writing for websites and blogs. In counselling the reader against common pitfalls such as jargon and poor structure, Gilda Williams points instead to the power of close looking and research, showing how to deploy language effectively; how to develop new ideas; and how to construct compelling texts. More than 30 illustrations throughout support closely analysed case studies of the best writing, in Source Texts by 64 authors, including Claire Bishop, Thomas Crow, T.J. Demos, Okwui Enwezor, Dave Hickey, John Kelsey, Chris Kraus, Rosalind Krauss, Stuart Morgan, Hito Steyerl, and Adam Szymczyk. Supplemented by a general bibliography, advice on the use and misuse of grammar, and tips on how to construct your own contemporary art library, How to Write About Contemporary Art is the essential handbook for all those interested in communicating about the art of today.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Publishers Weekly Review

Artforum correspondent Williams (The Gothic) applies lessons in graceful prose to the field of art writing. Contemporary art prose regularly tends toward dense, labyrinthine text that does little to illuminate the work, impenetrable to those who don't know the jargon and tedious to those who do. As Williams shows, the anecdote is less about secret, insider knowledge and more about the basics of clean prose. The guide's brief chapters cover topics such as "How to Substantiate Your Ideas," "How to Write a Press Release," and "Explaining vs. Evaluating." Readers with basic writing competency will have to wade through a good portion of obvious advice, like cautioning to avoid adverbs and encouraging multiple revisions. Williams excels, however, when looking at excerpts from accomplished critics, including Rosalind Krauss and Walter Benjamin, and when giving nuts-and-bolts advice for crafting specific genres of art-world documents (catalogue essays, short news articles, academic essays, and the like). At conclusion, a smart list for beginning a contemporary art library provides a useful point for novices looking to move forward. While a good deal of the basic prose advice is well-covered by any number of grammar and style guides, Williams's how-to provides enough art-specific insights to cut through the garble so common in the field. (Oct.) © Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.

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