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The strange case of Dr Jekyll & Mr Hyde / Robert Louis Stevenson.

By: Stevenson, Robert Louis, 1850-1894.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookSeries: Rollercoasters.Publisher: Oxford : Oxford University Press, 2010Description: 85 p. ; 21 cm.ISBN: 9780198329909 (pbk.) :.Subject(s): Good and evil -- Fiction | Physicians -- England -- London -- Fiction | Multiple personality -- Fiction | Premiers' Reading Challenge : 9-10DDC classification: 823.8 Summary: YA. Rollercoasters are popular with boys, girls and mixed-ability classes and are valued for their durable and user-friendly format. An accessible, appealing and educative edition of Stevenson's thrilling tale. Ages 12+.
Item type Current location Collection Call number Status Date due Barcode Item reserves
Junior Sunshine Library
Teenage Fiction T STEV Available IA0356650
Junior Keilor Library (DIY)
Teenage Fiction T STEV Issued 27/12/2019 IA0356643
Total reserves: 0

Formerly CIP.

YA. Rollercoasters are popular with boys, girls and mixed-ability classes and are valued for their durable and user-friendly format. An accessible, appealing and educative edition of Stevenson's thrilling tale. Ages 12+.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

School Library Journal Review

Gr 5 Up-Each book opens with a few paragraphs about the author and closes with a couple pages of related educational material. Dr. Jekyll has profiles of mad scientists, Gulliver's Travels offers an introduction to "Monsters and Midgets" in folklore, and Swiss Family Robinson includes a discussion of caves and their formation and uses. There is a clearly formulaic approach to the books, but the artwork is solid across the board and the layouts are attractive. Adherence to the original texts varies from title to title. For example, Swiss Family Robinson takes some liberties with dialogue and narration, whereas Gulliver's Travels is almost verbatim in its adaptation, changing only a few 25-cent words to 10-cent words, or similar paraphrasing. The most obvious shortcoming is the use of computer-generated speech bubbles and typed text, which looks really out of place in the middle of the lovely and detailed, hand-drawn illustrations. Overall, the quality of the art and respect for the original works give these adaptations an edge over what schools and libraries normally have to choose from in this category.-Jason M. Poole, Webster Public Library, NY (c) Copyright 2011. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

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