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Old school / by Jeff Kinney.

By: Kinney, Jeff.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookSeries: Diary of a wimpy kid ; 10. Publisher: Melbourne, Victoria : Penguin Books Australia, 2015Copyright date: ©2015Description: 217 pages : illustrations ; 20 cm.ISBN: 9780143309000 (paperback).Subject(s): Children's stories | Schools -- Juvenile fiction | Diary fiction | Premiers' Reading Challenge : 5-6DDC classification: 813.6 Summary: Life was better in the old days. Or was it? That's the question Greg Heffley is asking as his town voluntarily unplugs and goes electronics-free. But modern life has its conveniences, and Greg isn't cut out for an old-fashioned world. With tension building inside and outside the Heffley home, will Greg find a way to survive?
Fiction notes: Click to open in new window
Item type Current location Collection Call number Status Date due Barcode Item reserves
Junior Sydenham Library (DIY)
Junior Fiction J KINN Issued 30/11/2019 IA1162106
Junior St Albans Library
Junior Fiction J KINN Issued 12/10/2019 IA0825507
Junior Sydenham Library
Junior Fiction J KINN On reserve IA0825521 1
Junior Sydenham Library (DIY)
Junior Fiction J KINN Issued 01/12/2019 IA2022380
Junior Sunshine Library (DIY)
Junior Fiction J KINN Issued 30/11/2019 IA2022381
Junior Deer Park Library (DIY)
Junior Fiction J KINN Issued 28/11/2019 IA2022382
Junior Deer Park Library (DIY)
Junior Fiction J KINN Issued 06/12/2019 IA2022383
Junior Deer Park Library (DIY)
Junior Fiction J KINN Issued 29/11/2019 IA2022384
Junior Sunshine Library (DIY)
Junior Fiction J KINN Available IA2022385
Junior Keilor Library (DIY)
Junior Fiction J KINN Issued 23/11/2019 IA2022386
Junior Keilor Library (DIY)
Junior Fiction J KINN Available IA1162114
Junior Sydenham Library
Junior Fiction J KINN Issued 28/11/2019 IA1162122
Junior Sydenham Library (DIY)
Junior Fiction J KINN Issued 30/11/2019 IA1168209
Junior Sydenham Library (DIY)
Junior Fiction J KINN Issued 23/11/2019 IA0826444
Total reserves: 1

Life was better in the old days. Or was it? That's the question Greg Heffley is asking as his town voluntarily unplugs and goes electronics-free. But modern life has its conveniences, and Greg isn't cut out for an old-fashioned world. With tension building inside and outside the Heffley home, will Greg find a way to survive?

For primary school age.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Publishers Weekly Review

"Mom says the problem with society these days is everybody's got their nose in a screen, and nobody takes the time to get to know the people who live around them," laments Greg Heffley, who reluctantly kicks it old school in this 10th installment of the über-popular Diary of a Wimpy Kid series. When Mrs. Heffley gets the town to unplug for 48 hours, Greg tries (but naturally fails) to cash in on neighborhood foot traffic with a lemonade stand ("One guy had a problem with the fact that we were using the same glass for every customer"). Grandpa, who has moved in with the Heffleys to save money, is also full of "back in the day" stories; Greg and Rowley finally try playing kick-the-can, but quit of boredom after 30 seconds. A weeklong trip to "Hardscrabble Farm," where Greg and his classmates sleep in primitive cabins and do chores, is the final affront, though it reveals that Greg may come by his artful dodging honestly. Kinney's fans will find the same winning formula: at least one joke every two pages. Expect readers to line up for Greg's latest. Ages 8-12. Agent: Sylvie Rabineau, RWSG Literary Agency. (Nov.) © Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.

Booklist Review

Greg Heffley is kicking it old school in the newest addition to the Diary of a Wimpy Kid series though not by choice. As has come to be expected, his candid diary account of his day-to-day experiences is filled with humor and comic doodles. Prime among his observations is that grown-ups are convinced life was much better when they were kids. But Greg can't figure out what was so great about it. No one ever smiles in old-timey photos; there was no air-conditioning or baby wipes; and everyone thought Kick the Can was actually fun. What's more, his mom has organized a technology-free weekend for the neighborhood, filled with community service activities. (Greg's disastrous attempt at selling lemonade and his evasion of park clean-up duties are sure to garner laughs.) The highlight, however, is his class trip to Hardscrabble Farms for a week in the woods. Mishaps galore and a chilling rumor make for a highly entertaining, and fairly smelly, foray into the great outdoors and, thankfully, back home to modern comforts.--Smith, Julia Copyright 2016 Booklist

Horn Book Review

Now in his tenth outing, Greg doesn't want to go on the class trip to Hardscrabble Farms--until he needs a way to escape his fathers certain wrath. Theres no TV or cell phones, dinner is leftover stew, and rumors suggest there's a dangerous lunatic lurking in the woods. Frequent black-and-white cartoon-style illustrations and (sometimes gross) middle-school humor will engage reluctant readers. (c) Copyright 2016. The Horn Book, Inc., a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Kirkus Book Review

The Wimpy Kid series marches on.Greg Heffley's diary continues with the 10th entry in the popular franchise. This volume revolves around several loosely connected plot threads, the most prominent of which is Greg's grandfather's coming to live with the Heffley clan and the hilarity that ensues. Other plots involve Rodrick's first job, Mrs. Heffley's determination to turn the town into an electronics-free zone, and a trip to Hardscrabble Farms, the traditional field trip location for the seventh-grade class. The novel definitely lacks focus, but how many seventh-grader's diaries come with a complex narrative arc? Greg's rambling, irreverent musings coupled with his doodles maintain their charm even after so many years, and at this point fans of the series know what they're getting. The novel delivers the series' trademark family dynamics and absurdist comic stylings. Fans will chortle at the Heffley's pet pig, which wears pants, and smile as Greg and his dad come to an understanding over the pitfalls of camp life. By novel's end the characters have returned to their status quo and are ready for further comic mishaps. These diaries continue to be solid steppingstones into the literary world for any reluctant reader.Harmless fun that neither rocks the boat nor swings for the fences. (Graphic/fiction hybrid. 8-12) Copyright Kirkus Reviews, used with permission.

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