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Island home : a landscape memoir / Tim Winton.

By: Winton, Tim, 1960-.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: [Melbourne, Victoria] : Hamish Hamilton, an imprint of Penguin Books, 2015Copyright date: ©2015Description: 239 pages ; 23 cm.Content type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 9781926428741 (hardback).Subject(s): Winton, Tim, 1960- | Landscapes -- Australia | Authors, Australian -- 20th century -- Biography | Australia -- Description and travelDDC classification: 823.3 Summary: This apparently simple fact is the starting point for Tim Winton's beautiful, evocative and sometimes provocative memoir of how this unique landscape has shaped him and his writing. For over thirty years, Winton has written novels in which the natural world is as much a living presence as any character. What is true of his work is also true of his life: from boyhood, his relationship with the world around him -- rockpools, seacaves, scrub and swamp -- was as vital as any other connection. Camping in hidden inlets of the south-east, walking in the high rocky desert fringe, diving at Ningaloo Reef, bobbing in the sea between sets, Winton has felt the place seep into him, with its rhythms, its dangers, its strange sustenance, and learned to see landscape as a living process. Island Home is the story of how that relationship with the Australian landscape came to be, and how it has determined his ideas, his writing and his life. It is also a passionate exhortation for all of us to feel the ground beneath our feet. Much more powerfully than a political idea, or an economy, Australia is a physical entity. Where we are defines who we are, in ways we too often forget to our detriment, and the country's.
Item type Current location Collection Call number Status Date due Barcode Item reserves
Default St Albans Library
Non-fiction BIOG 823.3 WINT Available IA0564732
Default Sunshine Library
People, Law & Management
Non-fiction BIOG 823.3 WINT Available IA0564749
Default Sydenham Library (DIY)
Non-fiction BIOG 823.3 WINT Issued 07/01/2020 IA0564698
Total reserves: 0

Includes bibliographical references.

This apparently simple fact is the starting point for Tim Winton's beautiful, evocative and sometimes provocative memoir of how this unique landscape has shaped him and his writing. For over thirty years, Winton has written novels in which the natural world is as much a living presence as any character. What is true of his work is also true of his life: from boyhood, his relationship with the world around him -- rockpools, seacaves, scrub and swamp -- was as vital as any other connection. Camping in hidden inlets of the south-east, walking in the high rocky desert fringe, diving at Ningaloo Reef, bobbing in the sea between sets, Winton has felt the place seep into him, with its rhythms, its dangers, its strange sustenance, and learned to see landscape as a living process. Island Home is the story of how that relationship with the Australian landscape came to be, and how it has determined his ideas, his writing and his life. It is also a passionate exhortation for all of us to feel the ground beneath our feet. Much more powerfully than a political idea, or an economy, Australia is a physical entity. Where we are defines who we are, in ways we too often forget to our detriment, and the country's.

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Booklist Review

*Starred Review* There is a sense at the start of Man Booker Prize short-listed author Winton's (Eyrie, 2014) personal and cultural panorama of Australia that one has traveled too far off the map and become hopelessly lost in his transporting, place-specific language. Indigenous particularities feed Winton's life story and prose, and the landscape reads as alien and all-encompassing in its beauty, enormity, and seclusion. And it is all, as Winton details, imperiled. His passion to save this land shapes finely wrought chapters that mark significant years and locales in his life. In one telling passage, Winton describes looking at photographs of his Australian ancestors and seeing not the Northern Hemispheric optimism in frontier endeavors but rather genuine fear and apprehension stamped timelessly on their faces. Yet it is Winton's childhood memories of crouching in the bush and craggy beach caves that an innate sense of wonder surpasses the survivalist instinct to flee from dangerous slime-spewing fish or cower in the shadow of car-sized tree trunks. The world's largest island deserves nothing less than Winton's beautifully curated, intimate, environmentally sensitive history.--Ruzicka, Michael Copyright 2017 Booklist

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