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Our man in Havana / Graham Greene with an introduction by Christopher Hitchens.

By: Greene, Graham, 1904-1991.
Contributor(s): Hitchens, Christopher.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookSeries: Vintage Summer classics. Publisher: London : Vintage Books, 2015Copyright date: ©1958Description: xix, 225 pages ; 18 cm.Content type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 9780099599975 (paperback).Subject(s): Fathers and daughters -- Fiction | Intelligence service -- Fiction | Havana (Cuba) -- FictionDDC classification: 823/.912 Summary: He carried with him the breath of beaches and the leathery smell of a good club. This title comes with an introduction by Christopher Hitchens. Wormold is a vacuum cleaner salesman in a city of power cuts. His adolescent daughter spends his money with a skill that amazes him, so when a mysterious Englishman offers him an extra income he's tempted. In return all he has to do is carry out a little espionage and file a few reports. But when his fake reports start coming true things suddenly get more complicated and Havana becomes a threatening place.
Item type Current location Collection Call number Status Date due Barcode Item reserves
Default Sydenham Library (DIY)
Fiction GREE Available IA0847454
Total reserves: 0

First published 1958.

He carried with him the breath of beaches and the leathery smell of a good club. This title comes with an introduction by Christopher Hitchens. Wormold is a vacuum cleaner salesman in a city of power cuts. His adolescent daughter spends his money with a skill that amazes him, so when a mysterious Englishman offers him an extra income he's tempted. In return all he has to do is carry out a little espionage and file a few reports. But when his fake reports start coming true things suddenly get more complicated and Havana becomes a threatening place.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Publishers Weekly Review

Actor Jeremy Northam (Gosford Park, Tristram Shandy) has himself a ball with Greene's comic suspense novel, its Cuban setting and panoply of international characters. He downplays the religious and political undertones of the book in favor of Greene's comedy of a vacuum-cleaner salesman turned secret agent. Greene's array of Germans, Brits and native Cubans allows Northam to trot out some of the choicest examples from his stable of voices, all cleverly done. The brief bits of salsa music that punctuate the breaks between chapters underscore Northam's jaunty reading. This is one classic novel meant to be enjoyed for entertainment, not self-improvement. (June) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved

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