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Edwina the emu / Sheena Knowles ; illustrated by Rod Clement.

By: Knowles, Sheena.
Contributor(s): Clement, Rod.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookSeries: Premier's Reading Challenge, K-2: ; Picture bluegum: Publisher: Pymble, N.S.W. Angus & Robertson, 1996Copyright date: ©1996Description: 29 unnumbered pages : colour illustrations ; 27 cm.Content type: still image | text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 0207189137 :; 9780207189142(pbk); 9780207189142(pbk).Subject(s): Premier's Reading Challenge -- Year K - Year 2 | Picture books for children | Stories in rhyme | Australian wit and humor | Emus -- Poetry | Emus -- Juvenile fiction | Children's poetry, AustralianDDC classification: A823.3 Summary: After some false starts, Edwina and Edward decide to share the responsiblity of their ten eggs.
Item type Current location Collection Call number Status Date due Barcode Item reserves
Junior Deer Park Library (DIY)
Picture Book K Available IA1048475
Junior St Albans Library (DIY)
Picture Book K Available IA0913859
Junior Keilor Library (DIY)
Picture Book K Issued 27/10/2019 IA1048433
Junior Sunshine Library (DIY)
Picture Book K Available IA1048467
Junior Sydenham Library (DIY)
Picture Book K Available IA0913842
Junior Deer Park Library (DIY)
Picture Book K Available IA0913873
Total reserves: 0

CIP confirmed.

After some false starts, Edwina and Edward decide to share the responsiblity of their ten eggs.

Children.

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School Library Journal Review

PreS-Gr 1‘Two emus who live in a zoo suddenly find themselves expecting 10 little emus. But this is the `90s, so Edwina tells Edward, "I'll look for a job, you stay on the nest." She tries her feathers at a host of positions, from ballet dancer to chimney sweep, but none are right for her. So she heads home to share the workload with Edward. Knowles tells this entertaining tale in a catchy rhyming text. Clement's amusing cartoons complement the story, capturing the silly mood. Edwina sports a short ponytail tied back in a bright purple band, while the human characters are really caricatures, with exaggerated features and outrageous expressions that are sure to elicit laughs. Youngsters will be happy to follow along as life takes on new challenges for the emus and their soon-to-be family. The cadence of the text make it a good choice for reading aloud, although beginning readers will have fun with the rhymes as well.‘Dina Sherman, Brooklyn Children's Museum, NY (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

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