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Fight like a girl / Clementine Ford.

By: Ford, Clementine.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: Sydney : Allen & Unwin, 2016Copyright date: ©2016Description: 294 pages ; 24 cm.Content type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 9781760292362 (paperback).Subject(s): Women -- Crimes against -- Prevention | Feminism -- AustraliaDDC classification: 305.420994 Summary: ith wit, insight and glorious, righteous rage, Clementine Ford lays out all the ways in which girls and women are hurt and held back, and unapologetically demands that the world do better. A passionate and urgently needed call to arms, this book insists on our right to be angry, to be heard and to fight. Clementine Ford is a beacon of hope and inspiration to thousands of Australian women and girls. Her incendiary debut Fight Like A Girl is an essential manifesto for feminists new, old and soon-to-be, and exposes just how unequal the world continues to be for women. Crucially, it is a call to arms for all women to rediscover the fury that has been suppressed by a society that still considers feminism a threat.
List(s) this item appears in: Brimbank Writers and Readers Festival Authors | Read Up
Item type Current location Collection Call number Status Date due Barcode Item reserves
Default Deer Park Library (DIY)
People, Law & Management
Non-fiction 305.4209 FORD Available IA1265051
Default Keilor Library (DIY)
People, Law & Management
Non-fiction 305.4209 FORD Available IA1110751
Default Sunshine Library (DIY)
People, Law & Management
Non-fiction 305.4209 FORD Issued 12/01/2019 IA1110777
Total reserves: 0

"Raise voices. Raise courage. Raise the flag."--Cover.

ith wit, insight and glorious, righteous rage, Clementine Ford lays out all the ways in which girls and women are hurt and held back, and unapologetically demands that the world do better. A passionate and urgently needed call to arms, this book insists on our right to be angry, to be heard and to fight. Clementine Ford is a beacon of hope and inspiration to thousands of Australian women and girls. Her incendiary debut Fight Like A Girl is an essential manifesto for feminists new, old and soon-to-be, and exposes just how unequal the world continues to be for women. Crucially, it is a call to arms for all women to rediscover the fury that has been suppressed by a society that still considers feminism a threat.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

With just the right balance of sarcasm and straightforward, informational content, writer and broadcaster Ford's first book is one people need to read in the wake of the MeToo movement. The author defines systemic misogyny and how we internalize it, then breaks down topics such as abortion, eating disorders, mental illness, rape culture, and the enduring stereotyping of feminism as a movement based on man-hating, which delegitimizes the real anger we can and should feel toward those who violate women's and girls' rights. VERDICT Ford's quick, provocative read will appeal to anyone who desires a better understanding of the complex, intersectional issues so often lumped into phrases such as rape culture. Read alongside Susan Faludi's Backlash: The Undeclared War Against American Women and Jennifer Baumgardner and Amy Richards's Manifesta: Young Women, Feminism, and the Future.-Emily Bowles, Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison © Copyright 2018. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Booklist Review

In her ruthless debut essay collection, Australian activist and agitator Ford presents a feminist manifesto for the 2018 woman and her allies. Ford rails against the most contemporary issues of misogyny, from rape culture to partner violence to internet harassment. Blending memoir with critical analysis, she creates an intimate, though universal, call to arms. As a prominent feminist, Ford has seen her fair share of venom from readers online. As they've begged her to explain why she so deeply hates men, Ford uses this book to explore why men so viciously hate women. She meditates on society's insistence that women physically shrink themselves, how society polices the uterus, and how society allows the female body to be defiled over and over with few or no repercussions for the perpetrator and all this in a society still predominantly run by men. Ford's book is a galvanizing tour de force, begging women to never give up on the most radical act of all: loving themselves wholly and completely in a world that doesn't love them back.--Courtney Eathorne Copyright 2018 Booklist

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