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There's a monster in your book / written by Tom Fletcher ; illustrated by Greg Abbott.

By: Fletcher, Tom, 1985-.
Contributor(s): Abbott, Greg.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: London Puffin Books, 2017Copyright date: ©2017Description: 30 unnumbered pages : color illustrations ; 26 cm.Content type: text | still image Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 9780141376097(hbk).Other title: There is a monster in your book.Subject(s): Monsters -- Juvenile fiction | Books -- Juvenile fictionDDC classification: 823.92 Summary: A mischievous monster has invaded the pages of your book! Tom Fletcher's warm, witty and perfectly-judged narrative voice brings this wonderfully inventive debut solo picture book to life, inviting readers to create magic inside the book. Children will love interacting by tilting, spinning, shaking and blowing, and then seeing the impact as each page is turned. A fantastic celebration of all the fun that can be had with a book, with a wonderful wind-down bedtime ending!
Item type Current location Collection Call number Status Date due Barcode Item reserves
Junior Deer Park Library (DIY)
Picture Book F Issued 29/10/2019 IA1462996
Total reserves: 0

A mischievous monster has invaded the pages of your book! Tom Fletcher's warm, witty and perfectly-judged narrative voice brings this wonderfully inventive debut solo picture book to life, inviting readers to create magic inside the book. Children will love interacting by tilting, spinning, shaking and blowing, and then seeing the impact as each page is turned. A fantastic celebration of all the fun that can be had with a book, with a wonderful wind-down bedtime ending!

3+.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

School Library Journal Review

PreS-Gr 1-A monster has invaded this book! He looks innocent enough, and yet he is already tearing it apart. That is where readers come in. The goal is to dislodge the little critter by following the instructions and shaking the book, tickling the monster's feet, blowing on him, tilting the pages, and spinning the book around. The monster rolls and reels around each spread in an adorable "dance," before disappearing altogether. Or at least he would have, if not for the giggle-worthy twist at the end. All the instructions are simple enough for a toddler to participate in, however, some pages ask readers to perform an action "and turn the page." Young readers can also depend on visual cues for clarity, such as the font used for action words, and a single motion line that reveals the results of the actions. The monster, with his blue fur and striped T-shirt, is always easy to spot against the grainy white, yellow, and red backgrounds, which mimic the look of book paper. VERDICT A fun interactive book, great for a bedtime read with toddlers.-Rachel Forbes, Oakville Public Library, Ont. © Copyright 2017. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Horn Book Review

This interactive book (think Press Here meets The Monster at the End of This Book) has readers shaking pages and otherwise trying to expel a mischievous monster from "your book." But when he escapes "into your room," the book may be the better option. The directions are engaging, the monster is cute, and the illustrations include clever details such as the monster trying to turn back pages. (c) Copyright 2018. The Horn Book, Inc., a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Kirkus Book Review

Readers try to dislodge a monster from the pages of this emotive and interactive read-aloud."OH NO!" the story starts. "There's a monster in your book!" The blue, round-headed monster with pink horns and a pink-tipped tail can be seen cheerfully munching on the opening page. "Let's try to get him out," declares the narrator. Readers are encouraged to shake, tilt, and spin the book around, while the monster careens around an empty background looking scared and lost. Viewers are exhorted to tickle the monster's feet, blow on the page, and make a really loud noise. Finally, shockingly, it works: "Now he's in your room!" But clearly a monster in your book is safer than a monster in your room, so he's coaxed back into the illustrations and lulled to sleep, curled up under one page and cuddling a bit of another like a child with their blankie. The monster's entirely cute appearance and clear emotional reactions to his treatment add to the interactive aspect, and some young readers might even resist the instructions to avoid hurting their new pal. Children will be brought along on the monster's journey, going from excited, noisy, and wiggly to calm and steady (one can hope). Playful, engaging, and full of opportunities for empathya raucous storytime hit. (Picture book. 2-7) Copyright Kirkus Reviews, used with permission.

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