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Future home of the living god / Louise Erdrich.

By: Erdrich, Louise [author.].
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: London : Corsair, an imprint of Little, Brown Book Group, 2018Copyright date: ©2017Description: 269 pages ; 24 cm.ISBN: 9781472153357 (paperback).Subject(s): Ojibwa Indians -- Fiction | Natural law -- Fiction | Pregnant women -- Fiction | Adoptees -- Fiction | Human reproduction -- Law and legislation -- FictionGenre/Form: Dystopian fiction. | Science fiction.DDC classification: 813.6 Summary: The world as we know it is ending. Evolution has reversed itself, affecting every living creature on earth. Science cannot stop the world from running backwards, as woman after woman gives birth to infants that appear to be primitive species of humans. Thirty-two-year-old Cedar Hawk Songmaker, adopted daughter of open-minded Minneapolis liberals, is as disturbed as the rest of America around her. But for Cedar, this change is profound and deeply personal. She is four months pregnant. Cedar feels compelled to find her birth mother, Mary Potts, an Ojibwe living on the reservation, to understand both her and her baby's origins. As Cedar goes back to her own biological beginnings, society around her begins to disintegrate, fuelled by a swelling panic about the end of humanity.
List(s) this item appears in: Handmaid's Tale Reading List
Item type Current location Collection Call number Status Date due Barcode Item reserves
Default St Albans Library
Fiction ERDR Available IA1560922
Default Sunshine Library
Fiction ERDR Available IA1560930
Default Keilor Library (DIY)
Fiction ERDR Available IA1560914
Total reserves: 0

First published in the US in 2017 by Harper Collins.

The world as we know it is ending. Evolution has reversed itself, affecting every living creature on earth. Science cannot stop the world from running backwards, as woman after woman gives birth to infants that appear to be primitive species of humans. Thirty-two-year-old Cedar Hawk Songmaker, adopted daughter of open-minded Minneapolis liberals, is as disturbed as the rest of America around her. But for Cedar, this change is profound and deeply personal. She is four months pregnant. Cedar feels compelled to find her birth mother, Mary Potts, an Ojibwe living on the reservation, to understand both her and her baby's origins. As Cedar goes back to her own biological beginnings, society around her begins to disintegrate, fuelled by a swelling panic about the end of humanity.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

Twenty-six-year-old, four-months-pregnant Cedar Hawk Songmaker was adopted by Minneapolis liberals but has recently reconnected with her extended Ojibwe birth family. Reunion notwithstanding, the world is in dystopic collapse-evolution is in rapid reverse, the Church of the New Constitution has usurped control, the human race is imploding-and Cedar's determined to record the tumult for her unborn child. Her fertile womb makes her a target, as pregnant women are hunted and imprisoned; protecting her baby becomes a desperate race against time. Begun in 2001 (according to the acknowledgments) and completed in spring 2017 (revealed in the introduction), the interrupted incubation might explain the unfinished characterizations and disjointed story lines; only -Erdrich's richly nuanced reading improves the uneven narrative. VERDICT The rediscovered popularity of womb dystopia will surely fuel interest in Erdrich's Future; libraries should be prepared to provide multi-format access to the author's substantial audiences. ["This chilling speculative fiction is perfect for readers seeking the next Handmaid's Tale": LJ 9/15/17 review of the Harper hc.]-Terry Hong, -Smithsonian -BookDragon, Washington, DC © Copyright 2018. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Publishers Weekly Review

Set in Minnesota in a dystopian future in which evolution is going haywire, much of this startling new work of speculative fiction by Erdrich (LaRose) takes the form of a diary by pregnant Cedar Hawk Songmaker addressed to her unborn child. Happily raised and well-educated by her adopted parents Sera and Glen Songmaker, Cedar decides nevertheless to visit her Ojibwe birth family on the rez up north. But times are strange: "our world is running backward. Or forward. Or maybe sideways." Flora and fauna are taking on prehistoric characteristics, and there is talk of viruses. It isn't long before pregnant women are being rounded up. Cedar meets up again with her baby's father, Phil, and for a while she hides with him. But eventually she is caught by the authorities, who reveal nothing about what is happening. A hospital incarceration, escape, violence, and murder ensue as Cedar and other pregnant women she meets along the way-helped by the valiant Sera, Cedar's adoptive mother-will do anything to protect themselves and their babies. Erdrich's characters are brave and conscientious, but none of them really come across as people; they act mostly as vehicles for Erdrich's ideas. Those ideas, however-reproductive freedom, for one, and faith in and respect for the natural world-are strikingly relevant. Erdrich has written a cautionary tale for this very moment in time. (Nov.) © Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.

Booklist Review

*Starred Review* Cedar Hawk Songmaker, the adopted Native American daughter of two white Minnesota liberals, is secretly pregnant when she discovers that her birth name is Mary Potts. With this slash of wry cultural irony, Erdrich (LaRose, 2016) launches a breakout work of speculative fiction in which a sudden reversal of evolution is underway, threatening the future of humankind and life itself. The disintegrating, increasingly fascist and evangelical government is rounding up and incarcerating pregnant women, so Cedar heads to her Ojibwe birth mother's reservation. But no place is safe and she is soon on the run. Throughout her harrowing, often darkly funny ordeal, she keeps a journal for her child whom she knows she has little chance of raising recounting, with exceptional sensory and psychological precision, the horrors of her predicament, the wild courage of the underground network helping fugitive mothers-to-be, and, in stark contrast to the violent chaos, the miraculous growth of her fetus.In this feverish cautionary tale, Erdrich enters the realm of Margaret Atwood's The Handmaid's Tale (1985), Emily Schultz's The Blondes (2015), Edan Lepucki's California (2014), Laura van den Berg's Find Me (2015), and Claire Vaye Watkins' Gold, Fame, Citrus (2015), infusing her masterful, full-tilt dystopian novel with stinging insights into the endless repercussions of the Native American genocide, hijacked spirituality, and the ongoing war against women's rights. A tornadic, suspenseful, profoundly provoking novel of life's vulnerability and insistence. HIGH-DEMAND BACKSTORY: Erdrich's devoted readers will flock, of course, but so will a wider audience attracted by the bold apocalyptic theme, searing social critique, and high-adrenaline action.--Seaman, Donna Copyright 2017 Booklist

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