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The death of noah glass [electronic resource]. Gail Jones.

By: Jones, Gail.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: 2018Description: 1 online resource.ISBN: 9781925626445 (electronic bk).Subject(s): Fiction | LiteratureGenre/Form: Electronic books.Online resources: Click to access digital title. | Excerpt Sample | Image Large cover image | Thumbnail Thumbnail cover image Summary: The art historian Noah Glass, having just returned from a trip to Sicily, is discovered floating face down in the swimming pool at his Sydney apartment block. His adult children, Martin and Evie, must come to terms with the shock of their father's death. But a sculpture has gone missing from a museum in Palermo, and Noah is a suspect. The police are investigating. None of it makes any sense. Martin sets off to Palermo in search of answers about his father's activities, while Evie moves into Noah's apartment, waiting to learn where her life might take her. Retracing their father's steps in their own way, neither of his children can see the path ahead. Gail Jones's mesmerising new novel tells a story about parents and children, and explores the overlapping patterns that life makes. The Death of Noah Glass is about love and art, about grief and happiness, about memory and the mystery of time. The author of seven novels and two collections of stories, Gail Jones is one of Australia's most celebrated writers. Her work has been translated into twelve languages, awarded several prizes in Australia. Internationally her fiction has been longlisted for the Man Booker Prize and the Orange Prize and shortlisted for the IMPAC Award and the Prix Femina Étranger. She lives in Glebe, NSW. 'Told masterfully from the perspective of three finely drawn characters, The Death of Noah Glass combines an enjoyable escapade involving art theft, mafia conspiracy, romance and a suspicious death with a literary exploration of grief, identity and the power of the past to damage present lives. Fans of Jones will not be disappointed, and new readers should find much to recommend it.' Books+Publishing 'Jones is one of our greatest writers—for her enormous wisdom and insight as well as the shimmering intensity of her descriptive language.' West Australian
List(s) this item appears in: Stella Prize 2019 - Celebrating Australian Women's Writing
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The art historian Noah Glass, having just returned from a trip to Sicily, is discovered floating face down in the swimming pool at his Sydney apartment block. His adult children, Martin and Evie, must come to terms with the shock of their father's death. But a sculpture has gone missing from a museum in Palermo, and Noah is a suspect. The police are investigating. None of it makes any sense. Martin sets off to Palermo in search of answers about his father's activities, while Evie moves into Noah's apartment, waiting to learn where her life might take her. Retracing their father's steps in their own way, neither of his children can see the path ahead. Gail Jones's mesmerising new novel tells a story about parents and children, and explores the overlapping patterns that life makes. The Death of Noah Glass is about love and art, about grief and happiness, about memory and the mystery of time. The author of seven novels and two collections of stories, Gail Jones is one of Australia's most celebrated writers. Her work has been translated into twelve languages, awarded several prizes in Australia. Internationally her fiction has been longlisted for the Man Booker Prize and the Orange Prize and shortlisted for the IMPAC Award and the Prix Femina Étranger. She lives in Glebe, NSW. 'Told masterfully from the perspective of three finely drawn characters, The Death of Noah Glass combines an enjoyable escapade involving art theft, mafia conspiracy, romance and a suspicious death with a literary exploration of grief, identity and the power of the past to damage present lives. Fans of Jones will not be disappointed, and new readers should find much to recommend it.' Books+Publishing 'Jones is one of our greatest writers—for her enormous wisdom and insight as well as the shimmering intensity of her descriptive language.' West Australian

Electronic reproduction.

Excerpt provided by Syndetics

The hum of the day had gone, and the golden light. All around were ordinary things, his possessions, his furniture, remade as block shapes and shadowy presences. The night spoke to him in the language of child sensations retrieved: a clock that might have been a face, the taste of warm milk at bedtime, the secret lives of keys and cupboards and windows and paintings, a head resting on a pillow, the strange menace of hanging clothes. Excerpted from The Death of Noah Glass by Gail Jones All rights reserved by the original copyright owners. Excerpts are provided for display purposes only and may not be reproduced, reprinted or distributed without the written permission of the publisher.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Kirkus Book Review

Two orphaned adults try to make sense of their father's sudden death and their own grief.Australian author Jones' (A Guide to Berlin, 2015, etc.) new novel begins with a funeral. The eponymous Noah Glass, a 67-year-old art historian, is deadfound floating in his apartment complex's swimming pool. His adult children, Martin and Evie, come together to mourn their father's death and make sense of a shocking revelation: A famous sculpture is missing, and Noah is the prime suspect. In the aftermath of the funeral, Martin travels to seedy yet historic Palermo, Italy, to trace his father's footsteps and solve the mystery; Evie moves into Noah's apartment and tries to figure out her next steps. They work through their grief apart but togetherover grainy Skype calls and through their childhood memories and respective traumas. Weaving together multiple narratives (Noah's, Martin's, and Evie's), the novel sketches a family portrait full of love, loss, and regret. At times, the novel can feel weighed down by the overwhelming number of references to film, art history, and Australian and Italian history. Long stretches of the book seem tedious despite Jones' emotional and stunning meditations on grief, knowledge, and memory. If there are issues with the plotting or pacing, Jones' writing helps take the sting out. She distills complicated emotions and imagery and renders them beautifully: "the incandescent light falling like seawater over their small bent backs" and "clunky air conditioners stuck to their sides like ticks." There are wonderful subplotsEvie takes a job describing films to a blind man; Martin struggles with his ex-wife over their daughterthat are far more satisfying than the crime at the novel's center. The way Martin and Evie traverse their complex relationship in the wake of Noah's death is a particular strength; their journey feels real and earned.A sentence-level marvel burdened with too many layers. Copyright Kirkus Reviews, used with permission.

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