Normal view MARC view ISBD view

Blueprint : how DNA makes us who we are / Robert Plomin.

By: Plomin, Robert, 1948- [author.].
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: [London] : Allen Lane, an imprint of Penguin Books, 2018Copyright date: ©2018Description: xiii, 265 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm.ISBN: 9780241367698 (paperback).Other title: How DNA makes us who we are.Subject(s): DNA | Behavior geneticsDDC classification: 572.86 | 155.7 Summary: In 'Blueprint', behavioral geneticist Robert Plomin describes how the DNA revolution has made DNA personal by giving us the power to predict our psychological strengths and weaknesses from birth. A century of genetic research shows that DNA differences inherited from our parents are the consistent lifelong sources of our psychological individuality - the blueprint that makes us who we are. This, says Plomin, is a game-changer. It calls for a radical rethinking of what makes us who were are.
Item type Current location Collection Call number Status Date due Barcode Item reserves
Default St Albans Library
Science & Animals
Non-fiction 572.86 PLOM Available IA2017770
Default Sunshine Library
Science & Animals
Non-fiction 572.86 PLOM Available IA2017771
Total reserves: 0

Includes bibliographical references and index.

In 'Blueprint', behavioral geneticist Robert Plomin describes how the DNA revolution has made DNA personal by giving us the power to predict our psychological strengths and weaknesses from birth. A century of genetic research shows that DNA differences inherited from our parents are the consistent lifelong sources of our psychological individuality - the blueprint that makes us who we are. This, says Plomin, is a game-changer. It calls for a radical rethinking of what makes us who were are.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

In Blueprint, Plomin (King's College London) focuses on themes from large numbers of genomics studies that challenge core assumptions of the pre-genomics era. He chronicles how comparing genomes of individuals with and without complex phenotypes such as major depressive disorders led researchers away from the traditional notion that phenotypes are controlled by differences in just a few genes, to the modern view that phenotypes are shaped by many small-effect mutations in regions that regulate gene activity. Relevant statistical concepts are described with striking clarity. In this sense, the book serves as a thought-provoking and highly accessible intellectual history of genomics over the past two decades. The book is somewhat less successful in guiding readers' interpretation of Plomin's own work reporting a strong genetic component to socially complex phenotypes once viewed as strongly dependent on an individual's early-life environment. Such traits include lifetime educational attainment and mean daily hours of television viewing. While Plomin does acknowledge that such findings will necessitate careful societal consideration, the book ends rather abruptly, with only cursory discussion of the broader ethical concerns that will surely arise in the minds of many readers. The book is accessible for a general audience. Summing Up: Recommended. All readers. --Diane Patricia Genereux, Broad Institute of Harvard University and Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Powered by Koha