Normal view MARC view ISBD view

I am not sleepy and I will not go to bed : featuring Charlie and Lola / Lauren Child.

By: Child, Lauren.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookSeries: Child, Lauren. Charlie and Lola: Publisher: London : Orchard Books, 2017Copyright date: ©2017Description: 32 unnumbered pages : colour illustrations ; 19 cm.ISBN: 9781408351543.Other title: I'm not sleepy and I won't go to bed.Subject(s): Lola, (Fictitious character from Child) | Charlie, (Fictitious character from Child) | Bedtime -- Pictorial works -- Juvenile fiction | Children's stories -- Pictorial works | Board books | Bedtime -- Juvenile fiction | Lola (Fictitious character : Child) -- Juvenile fiction | Charlie (Fictitious character : Child) -- Juvenile fiction | Premiers' Reading Challenge : P-2DDC classification: 823.92 Summary: Charlie has this little sister Lola. Sometimes he has to try and get her to go to bed. This is a hard job because Lola likes to stay up late. Lola says, "I am not slightly sleepy at 6 or 7 or 8. I am still wide awake at 9 and not at all tired at 10, 11 and 12 and I will probably still be perky at even 13 o'clock in the morning".
Item type Current location Collection Call number Status Date due Barcode Item reserves
Junior Deer Park Library (DIY)
Board Book C Available IA2023886
Junior St Albans Library (DIY)
Board Book C Issued 12/06/2019 IA2023926
Junior Keilor Library (DIY)
Board Book C Available IA2023854
Total reserves: 0

Originally published: 2001.

"A Lauren Child original" -- Cover.

Charlie has this little sister Lola. Sometimes he has to try and get her to go to bed. This is a hard job because Lola likes to stay up late. Lola says, "I am not slightly sleepy at 6 or 7 or 8. I am still wide awake at 9 and not at all tired at 10, 11 and 12 and I will probably still be perky at even 13 o'clock in the morning".

0+.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Publishers Weekly Review

In this equally spirited follow-up to I Will Never Not Ever Eat a Tomato, big brother Charlie faces a new challenge: to cajole his sister, Lola, into bed. "Lola likes to stay up coloring and scribbling and sticking and wriggling and bouncing and most of all chattering," remarks the patient older sibling. Chatter she does, as the comic dialogue between the two attests. Warning that "I will probably still be perky at even 13 o'clock," Lola trots out some imaginative procrastination maneuvers. Charlie offers her a subtle bribe: " `If there's no bedtime there can be no bedtime drink, and it's strawberry milk tonight.' (Lola really likes strawberry milk.)" Lola counters that her three tiger pals need a similar treat as well. Creative situations also arise when it comes to toothbrushing (she says that a lion is using her toothbrush) and bathtime (she insists whales are swimming in the bathtub). Child's collages juxtapose photographs of flannel pajamas, bubble gum-pink toothpaste tube and bath bubbles with childlike drawings framed in exotic wallpaper patterns. These images emanate as much energy as does Lola herself, with text in an array of sizes and typefaces. Once again, Child tackles a common childhood conundrum with boundless imagination and zip. Ages 4-8. (Sept.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved

School Library Journal Review

PreS-Gr 1-Charlie and his sister, introduced in I Will Never Not Ever Eat a Tomato (Candlewick, 2000) return, this time in a whimsical bedtime tale. Charlie informs readers that when his parents ask him to put his sister to bed, "This is a hard job because Lola likes to stay up late.-most of all chattering." When he says, "But all the birds have gone to sleep," she does not fall for his logic: "But I am not a bird, Charlie." He tries to bribe her with her favorite drink, strawberry milk; she tells him that the three tigers at the table want some, too. And so this imaginative adventure continues-Lola and a lion brush their teeth, she takes a bath with a whale, Charlie phones two dancing dogs to ask whether she may borrow their pajamas. After hopping into bed at last, "small and very funny" Lola informs her brother that there is a hippopotamus in his bed. The illustrations and text are appealingly quirky and lively. The exuberant colors and patterns provide visual stimuli, and the varied fonts and sizes of the text and clever layout of the mixed-media artwork are sure to please. The cartoonlike characters are set against a surreal, collage background. The story is certain to remind youngsters of similar experiences, and is appropriate for storytimes and one-on-one sharing.-Olga R. Kuharets, Public Library of Charlotte & Mecklenburg County, NC (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Booklist Review

Ages 4-8. In I Will Never Not Ever Eat a Tomato (2000), older brother Charlie tries every ploy to get his stubborn, wildly imaginative younger sister, Lola, to eat. In this book, Charlie's still struggling, but this time, he's trying to get Lola to bed. Again he tries everything, and Lola has a fine excuse each step of the way. She can't brush her teeth because a lion is using her toothbrush. She can't put on her pajamas because they belong to dancing dogs who must be telephoned first. As in Child's previous titles, simple, appealing text plays straight man to the comedy in the collage illustrations--a riot of scribbled drawings, kitschy fabric swatches, and modern design that show Lola's version of things: the lion holds a toothbrush; the pajama-clad dogs leap joyfully. Whether they spot themselves in Charlie or in Lola, young ones will enjoy this exuberant, hilarious spin on the bedtime story. --Gillian Engberg

Horn Book Review

Poor Charlie is trying to get his irrepressible sister, Lola, off to bed, but for each of CharlieÆs requests, Lola has an imaginative stalling tactic (three tigers need their bedtime drink, a lion is using her toothbrush, or a whale's in the tub). The childlike tone and humor and the endearing mixed-media illustrations, which seem to vibrate with LolaÆs energy, will make this book a bedtime favorite. From HORN BOOK Spring 2002, (c) Copyright 2010. The Horn Book, Inc., a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Kirkus Book Review

Charlie, the patient older brother, struggles to get his imaginative, stubborn sister Lola to bed. Child brings back these siblings from I Will Never Not Ever Eat a Tomato (2000) with the wacky charm of her inviting cut-paper and photographic collages. Ordinary bedtime rituals are stalled as Lola throws up imaginary roadblocks. Three tigers join her for that last glass of strawberry milk. She can't brush her teeth because a lion is using her toothbrush. She can't take her bath because there are whales hogging the tub and she's not sure if the dancing dogs will let her use their pajamas. The rooms are strewn with the favorite things of childhood. Cutout photographs of real objects-building blocks and games-mingle with cartoon drawings of chairs and slippers. Colors shock: hot-pink bubble bath against a yellow sponge, for instance. Details delight, as with a photograph of the pajama set, which is decorated with clowns and seals and sports pearl buttons. A variety of typeface dances across the page with the text at one point even set on top of the pink, daisy pattern of a glass of milk. Charlie's and Lulu's expressive body language and facial features will be easily recognized by all. An inventive, entertaining bedtime tale. (Picture book. 5-8)

Powered by Koha