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The art of taxidermy / Sharon Kernot.

By: Kernot, Sharon.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: Melbourne : Text Publishing, [2018]Copyright date: ©2018Description: 231 pages : illustrations ; 20 cm.ISBN: 9781925603743; 1925603741; 9781925626728; 1925626725.Subject(s): Fathers and daughters -- Juvenile fiction | Australian fiction | Mothers -- Death -- Juvenile fiction | Young adult fiction | Loss (Psychology) -- Juvenile fiction | Novels in verse | Youth fiction | Domestic fiction | Motherless families -- Juvenile fiction | Families -- Juvenile fiction | Families | Grief | Taxidermy | Grief -- Juvenile fiction | Taxidermy -- Juvenile fiction | AustralianDDC classification: A823.4 Awards: Inky Awards Longlist, 2019.Summary: Lottie collects dead creatures and lovingly cares for them, hoping to preserve them, to save them from disintegration. Her father understands Lottie has a scientific mind, he thinks. Her aunt wants it to stop, and she goes to cruel lengths to make sure it does. And her mother? Lottie's mother died long ago and Lottie is searching for a way to be close to her. The Art of Taxidermy is a heartbreaking verse novel exploring love and death, grief and beauty, and the ways we try to make sense of it all.
List(s) this item appears in: Children's Book Council of Australia Awards 2019 | 2019 Prime Minister’s Literary Award Finalists
Item type Current location Collection Call number Status Date due Barcode Item reserves
Junior Deer Park Library (DIY)
Teenage Fiction T KERN Available IA2021356
Junior Sunshine Library (DIY)
Teenage Fiction T KERN Available IA2021358
Total reserves: 0

Prepublication record (machine generated from publisher information).

Lottie collects dead creatures and lovingly cares for them, hoping to preserve them, to save them from disintegration. Her father understands Lottie has a scientific mind, he thinks. Her aunt wants it to stop, and she goes to cruel lengths to make sure it does. And her mother? Lottie's mother died long ago and Lottie is searching for a way to be close to her. The Art of Taxidermy is a heartbreaking verse novel exploring love and death, grief and beauty, and the ways we try to make sense of it all.

12-15 years old.

Inky Awards Longlist, 2019.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

School Library Journal Review

Gr 8 Up--From the moment she found a dead gecko in her house, Lottie has been fascinated by death. She collects specimens to observe and dissect. Eventually, she learns about preservation of bodies, and she tries to preserve her specimens in various ways (drawings, photographs, etc.) Unfortunately for Lottie, Aunt Hilda doesn't approve of this kind of interest, at least not for a girl. Meanwhile, Lottie is haunted by her mother's death and other tragedies in her family. The novel also covers wartime prejudice and the internment of Germans in Australia during World War II. Squeamish readers may want to steer clear given the descriptions of dead animals, but readers who are as drawn to such things as Lottie is will find a beautifully written novel in verse that renders grief in an evocative and haunting way. VERDICT A sad story with a hopeful ending that will appeal to readers who appreciate unique stories and unusual characters.--Mindy Rhiger, Hennepin County Library, MN

Kirkus Book Review

A German Australian girl discovers a path toward resurrection in the wake of several family deaths.Lottie feels lonely at school, where peers accuse her of loving Hitler because of her German heritage, and in her family, where the three caring adults in her lifeher emotionally absent father, rigorously traditional Aunt Hilda, and ageing, mournful Omaall struggle under the weight of the family's multilayered grief. Lottie's parents and grandparents faced internment camps and isolation during the Second World War and were still working toward recovery when Lottie's older sister accidentally drowned; afterward, her mother died following a stillbirth. Lottie begins collecting the bodies of dead birds and other creatures, a hobby that horrifies and unsettles those around her. The only understanding soul she finds is an Indigenous boy named Jeffrey; they bond over their shared ostracization, and he helps her find animals for her collection. Lottie and other major characters are white, and the discrimination German Australians faced during the war is thoughtfully addressed. Lottie's family worries that her new interest betrays morbidity or violence, but as Lottie's steady, naturalistic verse narration shows, it truly centers on a longing for resurrection, manifested in her dream of becoming a museum taxidermist. The ample backstory is sometimes muddy and slows the pace, but vivid descriptions and Lottie's confident, complex voice atone for this.A thoughtful exploration of rebuilding life after death, told in grave and tactile verse. (Verse novel. 12-18) Copyright Kirkus Reviews, used with permission.

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