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A treatise of human nature / David Hume ; edited with an introduction by Ernest C. Mossner.

By: Hume, David, 1711-1776.
Contributor(s): Mossner, Ernest Campbell, 1907-.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookSeries: Penguin classics: Publisher: London : Penguin, 1984, c1969Description: 677 p. ; 20 cm.ISBN: 9780140432442 (paperback).Subject(s): Knowledge, Theory ofDDC classification: 128
Contents:
Book . 1 Of the understanding -- Book 11. Of the passions -- Book 111. Of morals.
Summary: One of the most significant works of Western philosophy, Hume's Treatise was published in 1739-40, before he was thirty years old. A pinnacle of English empiricism, it is a comprehensive attempt to apply scientific methods of observation to a study of human nature, and a vigorous attack upon the principles of traditional metaphysical thought. With masterly eloquence, Hume denies the immortality of the soul and the reality of space; considers the manner in which we form concepts of identity, cause and effect; and speculates upon the nature of freedom, virtue and emotion. Opposed both to metaphysics and to rationalism, Hume's philosophy of informed scepticism sees man not as a religious creation, nor as a machine, but as a creature dominated by sentiment, passion and appetite.
Item type Current location Collection Call number Status Date due Barcode Item reserves
Default Sydenham Library (DIY)
Non-fiction 128 HUME Available IA2032043
Total reserves: 0

Reprint of 1969 Pelican Books edition.

Bibliography: pages 29-30.

Book . 1 Of the understanding -- Book 11. Of the passions -- Book 111. Of morals.

One of the most significant works of Western philosophy, Hume's Treatise was published in 1739-40, before he was thirty years old. A pinnacle of English empiricism, it is a comprehensive attempt to apply scientific methods of observation to a study of human nature, and a vigorous attack upon the principles of traditional metaphysical thought. With masterly eloquence, Hume denies the immortality of the soul and the reality of space; considers the manner in which we form concepts of identity, cause and effect; and speculates upon the nature of freedom, virtue and emotion. Opposed both to metaphysics and to rationalism, Hume's philosophy of informed scepticism sees man not as a religious creation, nor as a machine, but as a creature dominated by sentiment, passion and appetite.

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